Going the distance in Aikido

Aikido

So it happens, for whatever reason you miss a training night, then another and then another. Pretty soon its been several weeks since you trained. Suddenly you feel weird about going back, perhaps you begin to question yourself, – is this really working out?

I can’t quote you specific drop out figures for Aikido, but i can tell you that in Krav Maga when I took the introductory class,  we were soon left with about 10% of students that were still there six months later. In itself that is not a bad thing. I am very much favour of ‘intro’ classes to Martial arts and combat systems. There is no shame in trying something out and realising that it is not for you, what works for one person may not always work for another. Being asked to sign up on the example of a single night on the mat can be an unrealistic expectation.

Still it is also common for medium term students to drop away, this is not exclusive to Aikido, all Martial Arts and Combat Systems experience similar statistics.

Yet it is at this point that it is worth examining your reasons for why you may not wish to continue. For many people this is the point where you may be leaving for no other reason than that your motivation is lacking for something that you may well still love.

Here are some points for overcoming the mid term blues.

#1 Choose carefully in the first place. As above, it is a good thing to try introductory courses and to visit various disciplines to try them out, yet once you do commit to something your decision needs to be resolute and not still wavering in indecision. Otherwise you will begin to question your decision.

#2 If you have made the wrong choice, change. If you are three months into training and you realise that this is not for you, make the hard decision now to leave, not later on when it can become harder and more confusing. When it gets tough at the gradings later on down the track you need to know that this is really what you want to do, not simply the consolation prize because you could not get into what you really wanted.

#3 Understand that you will have to put in the work to motivate yourself. I love watching the various sports at the Winter Olympics. I also have some understanding of the massive amount of sacrifice that those athletes have put into it to be there. The constant 5am training, the strict dietary requirements, the constant pressure to be better. There is no easy way to say it, yet there are many times in training when you will face opposition and if you wish to break through you will have no other option but to take on the attitude of drinking a cup of cement and hardening up.. Sometimes the best feeling of making the grade is when you look back on what you were prepared to do in order to take the journey.

#4 Commit to being in it for the long haul. When training gets hard, you need to be able to draw on the reasons why you are there in the first place. This is why you need to keep a training diary with the reasons for why you are there written into the front pages. You should be able to turn the pages back and be reminded of the goal that you are working towards.

#5 Use your training diary to set and achieve small and large goals. There is more to having goals than just gradings, you need to know what your personal best is at the various techniques and what you can and cannot do and you need to set goals with a view to achieving the things that you cannot. Achieving goals can be addictive and motivating. Being able to track real progress can get you through the bad weeks when it gets tough.

#6 Be inspired by O’Sensei Morihei Ueshiba. Go take a look at the history of O’Sensei, go right back to his service in the Japan-Russo war. O’Sensei saw and experienced many things that shaped his outlook on life and we are very fortunate in that many things that he said were recorded and translated into english for us to study and ponder upon today. Many people outside of Aikido draw on the philosophical nature of the writings of O’Sensei for encouragement and you will find encouragement to continue your Aikido journey there also.

You will find that when you train, you will have good weeks and bad weeks, you will have good nights where everything just clicks and you will have other nights where what you did well the week before falls in a heap this time around. You will forget things, remember parts of techniques and get confused with content from different techniques. This is something that will continue to happen to you not matter what the colour of the patch is that you have earned along the way, it is something that your Sensei and fellow students have all been through before. Don’t allow this experience to set you back and make you believe that you cannot learn the techniques that are required of you, Repetition and commitment to training will get you there when it counts. Commit to keeping a diary of your training and you will soon be in a place where you look back on what you through you could not do from a place of where you can do those things along with more difficult techniques.

Keep the faith!

Shalom.

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Going the distance in Krav Maga.

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So it happens, for whatever reason you miss a training night, then another and then another. Pretty soon its been several weeks since you trained. Suddenly you feel weird about going back, perhaps you begin to question yourself, – is this really working out?

I can’t quote you specific drop out figures for Krav Maga, but i can tell you that from the intro class that I attended we were soon left with about 10% of students that were still there six months later. In itself that is not a bad thing. I am very much favour of ‘intro’ classes to Krav Maga. There is no shame in trying something out and realising that it is not for you, what works for one person may not always work for another.

Still it is also common for medium term students to drop away, this is not exclusive to Krav Maga, all Martial Arts and Combat Systems experience similar statistics.

Yet it is at this point that it is worth examining your reasons for why you may not wish to continue. For many people this is the point where you may be leaving for no other reason than that your motivation is lacking for something that you may well still love.

Here are some points for overcoming the mid term blues.

#1 Choose carefully in the first place. As above, it is a good thing to try introductory courses and to visit various disciplines to try them out, yet once you do commit to something your decision needs to be resolute and not still wavering in indecision. Otherwise you will begin to question your decision.

#2 If you have made the wrong choice, change. If you are three months into training and you realise that this is not for you, make the hard decision now to leave, not later on when it can become harder and more confusing. When it gets tough at the gradings later on down the track you need to know that this is really what you want to do, not simply the consolation prize because you could not get into what you really wanted.

#3 Understand that you will have to put in the work to motivate yourself. I love watching the various sports at the Winter Olympics. I also have some understanding of the massive amount of sacrifice that those athletes have put into it to be there. The constant 5am training, the strict dietary requirements, the constant pressure to be better. There is no easy way to say it, yet there are many times in training when you will face opposition and if you wish to break through you will have no other option but to take on the attitude of drinking a cup of cement and hardening up.. Sometimes the best feeling of making the grade is when you look back on what you were prepared to do in order to take the journey.

#4 Commit to being in it for the long haul. When training gets hard, you need to be able to draw on the reasons why you are there in the first place. This is why you need to keep a training diary with the reasons for why you are there written into the front pages. You should be able to turn the pages back and be reminded of the goal that you are working towards.

#5 Use your training diary to set and achieve small and large goals. There is more to having goals than just gradings, you need to know what your personal best is at the various techniques and what you can and cannot do and you need to set goals with a view to achieving the things that you cannot. Achieving goals can be addictive and motivating. Being able to track real progress can get you through the bad weeks when it gets tough.

#6 Be inspired by Imi Litchtenfeld. Go take a look at the history of the founder of Krav Maga imi Litchtenfeld. Everything he earn’t for himself was via a struggle in the face of overwhelming odds. His training saved  and saves the lives of many people in some of the most heinous situations that you can imagine. Imi has various philosophical points that go along with the standard training in the syllabus. Allow his wisdom to motivate you.

You will find that when you train, you will have good weeks and bad weeks, you will have good nights where everything just clicks and you will have other nights where what you did well the week before falls in a heap this time around. You will forget things, remember parts of techniques and get confused with content from different techniques. This is something that will continue to happen to you not matter what the colour of the patch is that you have earned along the way, it is something that your instructors and fellow students have all been through before. Don’t allow this experience to set you back and make you believe that you cannot learn the techniques that are required of you, Repetition and commitment to training will get you there when it counts. Commit to keeping a diary of your training and you will soon be in a place where you look back on what you through you could not do from a place of where you can do those things along with more difficult techniques.

Keep the faith!

Shalom.

Third Party Protection.

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Have you ever been in a situation where through no fault of your own and as an innocent party you have come across a situation where for whatever reason two adults decide to punch it out and fight in public?

The first observation that I would make is that it is generally nothing like what you might see in a Hollywood movie. Neither is the reaction nor response from the people in the general vicinity.

One morning I was on my way to work and encountered road works. The situation was that one lane was cut off and traffic was required to zip merge into the other lane to get around the roadworks… For various reasons a number of members of the general public seen to have little idea on how to actually complete a zip merge in traffic and other people simply have the aggressiveness that is veneered under their own personality brought out when they get behind the wheel of a car and it often seems to come out in situations like these. Anyway two vehicles approach the zip merge point, one a four wheel drive Nissan and the other a Ford Falcon Station Wagon (Yes they still make the Ford Falcon in Australia!). Naturally neither driver wishes to pull back and allow the other driver to move over, so the end result is that a relatively minor collision takes place. The four wheel drive pushes through and after we have passed the road works, both vehicles come to a halt and the drivers jump out. The driver of the Falcon is perhaps in his 30’s, the Nissan perhaps in his late 40’s. The Falcon driver raises his hands in the air as if to say ‘what is your problem’, the Nissan driver continues walking towards him and punches him in the face and follows it up with a number of pummelling style blows to the face. The other chap responds in the same manner and they slug it out for less than 30 seconds. There is  no ‘winner’, the driver of the Falcon has blood streaming from his nose, they both get back in their vehicles and drive away.  Naturally no details are exchanged to resolve any insurance claims for the accident. For whatever reason the only response from other motorists was to lean on their horns perhaps believing that the sound of a car horn may stop people fighting or draw the attention of witnesses.

What I learned from this experience, is that as an adult there is no joy whatsoever in watching two people fight on the street. The idiots involved become both a danger to themselves and to the other people that get caught up nearby. When it happens at sporting events or on a bus or train, often nearby spectators or passengers have little space to withdraw to. For a younger person or often simply members of the public in general, it can be both intimidating and frightening to view this scenario playing out in front of you and members of your family.

Krav Maga because of its historical roots has a specific focus on training for third party protection i.e. for instances where you come across an instance of an assault of some type and may feel that you have no other option but to intervene. This type of training and putting it into practice is not something taken lightly in the Krav Maga syllabus. Many people have been killed or maimed by getting involved in fights to break them up, especially if a weapon is involved or is  introduced. Krav Maga techniques are nothing like what you see Hollywood demonstrating in movies on TV. It is based around targeted atemi strking and removing yourself from the situation as quickly as possible with the absolute minimum of time spent in that person’s body space. It has to be experienced in close combat training to be correctly understood.

Since the 1950’s and perhaps earlier, the British police have had an interesting approach to dealing with instances where a fight has broken out between two people or a group or people. In a number of cases they simply stand back and allow the people to slug it out.. Police in Britain do not carry side arms and could quickly be overcome by a group of people if they attempted to intervene, alternatively the two people fighting can simply turn on the officer. Fight psychology suggests that in many cases after 30 seconds of intense punching most people that don’t have any training are generally physically spent and often have received injuries that disable them or have injured themselves in the process. That is often the point where the intervention then begins. Naturally it is a different scenario if a person is being attacked, yet in cases where two idiots or groups of idiots have grandstanded one another and are trading blows  they may be simply better left to their own devices rather than someone else risking their own safety by trying to intervene.

My advice to you is to think very carefully before you decide to intervene in two people fighting on the street or in the train carriage on your daily commute. Your best strategy may be to utilise your training to look for exits and the content of your surroundings and to act to protect others from being hit by simply getting them out of the way of what is happening. If you are a Krav Maga student or if you train in another Martial Art or Combat System, you may like to consider speaking with your Sensei or Instructor about the formal training that your organisation offers in this area. This type of training is often more than simple techniques on a mat and in Krav Maga is often an occasion where students are required to learn and be familiar with fighting psychology in parallel with the techniques taught in the syllabus. If your Instructor or Sensei has a time at the conclusion of training where questions are taken, it can be good to bring it up with discussion with them about where they may introduce that level of training to you so you can take it further if you wish to.

When Karate meets Krav Maga and Aikido

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As a number of readers of dontmakemeangrymrmcgee will already know, I am a keen fan of most styles of Martial Arts / Combat Systems and Physical Training in general. I don’t have an agenda to try and prove that one is better than another,  to do so is largely futile in my opinion. I have long taken the view that different Martial Arts & Combat Systems suit different types of people and also suit different people at different stages of the life span. Yet I want to point out that I quite often enjoy visiting and training in various other marital arts and combat systems also as I am sure many of you do too. When you reach the point where you do not feel insecure about what you train in, a whole new world of training and cross training can open up to you if that is your wish. With that in mind I would like to make a few points on what many would see as an old school traditional martial art generically called “Karate”.

It is sad to say, yet needs to be brought up at the outset, that you have to separate the wheat from the chaff when you look at people that claim to represent Karate organisations. Karate exploded in popularity in the 1970’s/80’s and saw a number of people jump on board with the goal of making money and being awarded grading’s that were not earned but given in order to expand different organizations. The popularity of Karate has since receded somewhat, yet like Taekwondo the McDojo movement is still alive and well amongst them. Yet at the same time there are also some very genuine people that are in leadership of Karate organizations and a number of people that train with them that are incredibly good at the style of Karate that they train in. Sadly some of the idiots from the McDojo movement are also migrating across to the likes of Krav Maga, Aikido, Muay Thai and BJJ amongst others, so the problem is not restricted to just the Karate / Taekwondo movement but is something the rest of us need to be across also.

I have always had a strong respect for the old school Karate,- perhaps, there is a little nostalgia in there also,. Yet watching experienced Karateka deliver kicks and strikes with true power is something to see and something great to be a part of if you have the opportunity to train with them. You can learn a lot from an experienced Karateka if you are willing to listen and to observe and to exclude yourself from the debate about the relevance of Kata’s which seems to dominate different people.

It is my view that Karate can offer a lot to a Krav Maga practitioner or to an Aikidoka. Krav Maga has a strong focus on attack patterns that are exclusive to Krav Maga. Aikido has several ‘strikes’ that are used in an attack form to facilitate the response in Aikido. Often these strikes are performed poorly, slowly and without a sense of realism. The Krav Maga striking patterns in contrast are done in repetition and as a result you are ready for the technique from your partner because you know what is coming and you are trained to receive it.  Krav Maga utilises low Savate style kicks as attack kicking, yet this may not be the kicking attack that will be coming for you in an aggressive attack. When asked to replicate Karate styled kicks many Krav Maga & Aikidoka can struggle because it is not something we repetitively practice. When confronted with an actual Karate Kick from an experienced Karateka, delivered at the correct speed and with the right power behind it, many Krav Maga or Aikido people can find that it will in fact blast straight through their defence and land as a direct hit with the resulting injury. I mean no disrespect to anyone here, yet living in fairy land believing that you can deal with any attack that comes your way that you have not practiced for is a good way to get yourself beaten up if you are in fact attacked or going to the aid of someone else. A similar scenario exists for the variety of punches trained for in Karate, as an example there is a Karate punch called a ‘ura zuki’ which resembles what we might know as an uppercut. It is delivered at force to the soft pallet of your attacker and is the kind or punch that can easily crush the throat and cause suffocation. The point that I am driving at is that it is easy to believe that Karate Punches are rigid and slow yet once you actually encounter a real Karateka you will find that is not even remotely the case.

The advantage that Karate offers to the Krav Maga person or the Aikidoka is the capacity to learn how to kick and strike with raw power and efficiency. Ideally if you are trained at the top level of Krav Maga or Aikido, there is an expectation  that you should be able to deal with this type of attack. Yet to be able to deal with it, it is a good strategy to have experienced it first and by doing so, not by being on the receiving end of a weak effort from someone that has not real training at all in these  types of attack techniques.  Training in Karate and learning the basic kicking and striking movements gives you the capacity to do just that and to be able to deliver it yourself to your fellow students on the mat or on the gym floor at training. I know of one Krav Maga centre that has a Karate Sensei that is invited along to training from time to time for exactly this purpose. By having a culture of respect where you train, it gives you the capacity to do this type of thing and to increase your training skills at the same time. – Worth considering anyway.

Why punching is a bad option for Self Defence.

Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser) - Mad Men - Season 5, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Ron Jaffe/AMC

Striking with a clenched fist.

If you take the advice of hollywood movies or youtube clips, it would appear that in order to defend yourself you make a fist and repeatedly strike the atemi points of your attacker. Down they go and you walk out a hero…

The fact is that reality often proves to be quite a lot different. If you rely solely on your fists in a self defence situation and you fail you will like be seriously injured or killed by your attacker in a short space of time.

So what can happen when you strike someone with a clenched fist? – More often than not, the best / most powerful punch you can make will not fell your opponent and will likely break your own knuckle/s in the process. In reality the flurry of bare knuckle punching you see in the movies will break knuckles, bones and destroy the ligaments in your hands. Your hands are made up of a variety of different parts that are all weak and vulnerable to repeated bare knuckle punching, no matter how good you think you are.

In Krav Maga the syllabus teaches the student Western Boxing. Rather than punching in a wild flurry, you are taught how to make a fist and how to deliver punches in conjunction and coordination with the movement of your feet. Yet Krav Maga goes on to teach students how to deliver high speed / force palm and elbow strikes along with knee striking and Savate styled ankle kicks / breaks. For a new student to Krav Maga it can seem an unusual technique to strike with the palm as opposed to the fist. Yet there is a very clear methodology here. Palm and elbow strikes deliver high power hits that have the capacity to do far less damage to the person using them in their striking patterns. Krav Maga moves through a cycle of fist / palm / knee strikes in the introductory levels to get students used to the fact that we don’t want you to rely on fist striking alone in order to defend yourself.

Sadly what can happen is that people panic, and launch into a flurry of fist striking and break their knuckles or the bones in their hands in the process. Try repeatedly striking someone with a broken hand and you will likely find that if that is the limit of your techniques, you are likely going to be beaten up quite badly.

In your class time you will be shown the striking patterns that you need to learn for your grading. I would like to suggest to you that you consider investing in a bag of your own to practice with at home and to learn to feel the force that can be delivered via palm and elbow striking and to practice in such a way that your palm and elbow strikes become delivered via muscle memory with real power.

If your goal is to learn some real Self Defence training, the above is a good example of why Krav Maga is one of the best options to learn to defend yourself with. Krav Maga is set up around real situations and is used in real combat situations, what does and does not work has been evolved over a number of years of the development of the Krav Maga system. If your goal is to learn a martial art for self defence, then do yourself a favour and at least include a Krav Maga gym as you visit local dojo’s in your area. I suspect you may well like what you find there!

Aikido, Anger and Dr David Banner

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Hopefully you are familiar with Dr David Banner and his transformation as a result of the manifestation of Anger into the Incredible Hulk; – Indeed – “Mr McGee, don’t make me angry, you wouldn’t like me when I’m angry”!

Those that follow the series will be aware of the various efforts that Dr David Banner goes through to try and suppress his anger as he works towards finding a cure. A cure that might release him from the burden that he carries of his both his transformation into the Incredible Hulk and the burden of not knowing if the Hulk is responsible for the death of his colleague Dr Elaina Harding Marks. –“ A murder which David Banner can never prove he or the creature didn’t commit. So he must let the world go on thinking that he, too, is dead, until he can find a way to control the raging spirit that dwells within him”.

 Anger is an interesting emotion, interesting in that it is generally viewed in a negative sense. Like Dr David Banner there are many people that work hard to suppress their anger for various reasons, perhaps in cases for the explosive rage and poor decision making processes that can accompany an outburst of anger for many people.

O’Sensei has an interesting commentary on Anger and human emotion in the records of his teachings. As quoted from O’Sensei “Each day of human life contains joy and anger, pain and pleasure, darkness and light, growth and decay. Each moment is etched with natures grand design. Do not try to deny or oppose the cosmic order of things”.

It is interesting that O’Sensei is suggesting that we not be opposed to the cosmic order of these emotions. It is my view that from time to time we need to ‘manage’ our emotions as opposed to ‘suppressing’ our emotions.

Whilst some may see anger as a negative emotion, it is also a necessary emotion to experience. It is quite okay to be angry from time to time. There are things in the world that should make you angry. If you learn to use Anger as ‘Motivation’ you will find that anger actually helps you achieve your goals. Take for example a person that is stuck in a rut of being overweight. I suspect that you may know people that were in a situation like that who tried various things to change and nothing worked, then one day you saw that person and noticed a significant weight loss. If you ask that person what happened and what it was that actually changed they may tell you something along the lines that all of a sudden they just had enough and made the decision right there and then to change and it suddenly clicked for them. What has actually happened in a number of cases is that the actual problem of being overweight has got at that person over a number of years and worn them down, some people simply give up, others go on to experience rising anger at the situation and suddenly it is this anger that gives them the motivation to make it stick and actually change.

I used an example of weight loss, but this same scenario can occur in marital arts training also, particularly if you fail a grading. You can be angry at your Sensei or the Organisation, yet eventually if you are realistic some of that anger may well turn around and be directed at your own self and again there it is, if you accept that the future lies with you, you can use this sense of anger to motivate yourself to train and to do what needs to be done to change things.

Anger can also be for good reasons, there was an occasion recorded in history when Jesus Christ walked into the temple and saw that it was being used as a business to help the wealthy profit from the very poor in society. It is reported that he became angry and pushed over there tables, then made a whip from cords and physically drove those people out of the temple courts and returned that area to the people. The same is true for the rest of us today, when we see things that are wrong and unjust, sometimes there are times when it should make you angry and your response should be to stand up and to do something about it.

Returning to Dr David Banner, it is my view that no amount of Aikido training and philosophy could ever prevent him from becoming angry, simply because that is not what Aikido is for. Aikido is not religious, many of the great Sensei’s that have passed before have taught great philosophy, yet even that is external to Aikido. The hope of O’Sensei was that Aikido would lead people to have a desire to have world peace, yet here is the thing, if the injustices of the world do not make us feel the emotion of anger, how do we find the motivation then to change things, would we not simply carry on as we are and let things simply also stay the same?

Anger, yes it is a choice as are other emotions at times, but it can also be a choice for good, not something negative. Could it be that it is time that you allowed yourself to become angry about a situation that needs to change and got up and did something about it?

What ‘not’ to do at Wing Chun Training

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Are you new to Wing Chun? Would you like some solutions to avoid having a rough time at training? Check out this list for some tips and advice for going the distance in Wing Chun!

#1, The person out the front is called your ‘Sifu’, your Sifu runs the show, – if they are talking, do everyone a favour and try to let them talk. There is plenty of time to ask questions before and after training, if your Sifu wants to answer questions they will make time available during the class and ask. Let them teach and don’t take up the time of the rest of the class asking something you can discuss after class.

#2, Try not to whinge and complain about ‘feeling exhausted’. It is normal to be exhausted and muscle fatigued after a Wing Chun training session. You will get used to it if you put your head down and train. This is a part of what you paid your money for.

#3, Your training centre is called a ‘Kwoon’ and must be treated with every respect. At the front of the Kwoon is an altar, this is not a considered a religious altar because Wing Chun is not ‘the way’ but something that may point you to ‘the way’ if you are seeking. Do not lean on or place items on the altar, bow and or show the attitude of reverence towards the altar as directed by your Sifu.

#5, Don’t bring food into the Kwoon. Its great that you like to pig out on McDonalds before class. Kindly leave it outside of the building or in your car. Try to brush your teeth afterwards if you plan to train.

#6, Use deodorant liberally, Fairly obvious really, if you are wondering why no one wants to pair up with you at class, chances are this may be a reason..

#7, Leave your Ego at the door, Its great that you work out & have experience in XYZ martial arts. Looks are often decieving. that weedy looking guy in the corner will most likely serve you your arse on a plate irrespective of how buff you are or how much you think you know. Try learning from people as opposed to showing them what you know.

#8, If you are hungover, injured, sick, or sunburnt, Do your training partners a favour and don’t train. Simply stay at home, a conscious effort needs to be made to turn up to training with the right attitude. Don’t turn up with an injury and have an expectation that people will want to train techniques with you,

#9, Treat your partner with respect. Your training partner is allowing you to use their body to practice techniques. Show them every respect and don’t do anything that may injure or potentially injure your training partner. idiots that cause injury are often shown the door or soon discover that no one wishes to train with them. Bear in mind that it is a privilege for someone to train Wing Chun with you, not a right.

#10, Pull back on the F and other abusive words. In your own home or workplace you may love to curse or blaspheme. To do so in the Kwoon is considered disrespectful to both your Sifu, fellow students and the founders and liniage of Wing Chun. Don’t be the student that has to be given the quiet word from the Sifu to not to act like an idiot.

#11. Don’t make Anti-Asian or Anti-Chinese statements or remarks. Gradings at the top level in Wing Chun are routinely conducted in China, As are world championships. If you are a racist or have a dislike of other races, Wing Chun is not going to be for you.

#12, If the Sifu asks “who has strong wrists”?, try not to answer.. 🙂

#13, On the subject of wrists, – “if the Sifu asks ‘what would you like to work on today’, don’t say ‘wrist locks‘. the rest of your class mates will hate you for it! 🙂

#14, If you are called out the front of class to do a technique, perform it quickly! – Standing there like a deer caught in the headlights will ensure the technique is performed on you, potentially several times over!

#15, if you have the misfortune to have a partner that does act like a muppet, – this can be a great opportunity to call the instructor over (whilst moving behind your partner) and let them know that you don’t really understand how the Wing Chun wrist and elbow locks work… Repeat until your partner repents! 🙂

#16, Above all, enjoy making new friends and learning something new! – Ip man is quoted as having said “We all have inner demons to fight. We call these demons ‘fear’, and ‘hatred’, and ‘anger’. If you don’t conquer them, then a life of a hundred years… is a tragedy. If you do, a life of a single day can be a triumph.” What you do with Wing Chun and where it takes you comes down to what you want to commit and put into it. Train hard, learn from your Sifu and train your body, above all, enjoy yourself in the process!